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Thanks to Editor Steven Nicastro steven.nicastro@patch.com at The Levittown Patch, we have the Long Island beach Guide, which we have excerpted the Hamptons Section.

And while, it is typically difficult for “out of area” folks to do our local delicacies justice, Steven has done a pretty good job describing our beaches.  Just the same, it is a fairly comprehensive list, so check it out:

THE HAMPTONS

While the western Long Island beaches are great, world-class, even, the beaches on the South Fork stretching from West Hampton Dunes to Montauk are a rare breed, marked by rolling waves and soft sand set in front of some of the most dramatic real estate in the United States. Since the region has dozens of beaches, each unique, please click through to each expanded directory listing for more details. Fees and permits vary depending what village and town or village manages the beach. In many cases, parking permits are only available to locals, but taxi options and walk-ons give visitors the opportunity to enjoy the beaches.

Westhampton – Hampton Bays

Beaches in this stretch are part of the Westhampton Island, a barrier island like Fire Island to the West. In this case, Dune Road runs the length of it, from the quiet of West Hampton Dunes, the party-heavy Westhampton Beach and ending at Ponquogue Beach in Hampton Bays at the gateway to the Hamptons.

Quogue Village Beach – One of the quietest beaches on Dune Road west of the Shinnecock Canal, Quogue Village beach is low-key, with a playground and a concession stand to go with the perfect sand.

Cupsogue Beach – This Suffolk County park is a local paradise, with long sandy beaches, a cabana, hiking trails, four-wheel access, free Wi-Fi and the chance to spot local seals sunning on sandbars.

Lashley Beach – Managed by the Village of Westhampton, Lashley is offers a local hideaway and surfing spot that far less rowdy than the shores at the Dune Deck Beach Resort nearby.

Ponquogue Beach – This beach, run by the Town of Southampton, is another local gem, stretching to the end of the barrier island. Beach, surf, concessions and showers are available, but the family atmosphere is what attracts most. It’s a gorgeous spot.

Tiana Beach – Another county-run beach, but this ones has a few different faces. By day it’s lazy and family oriented, but with the nearby clubs Tiana can become a lot more spirited as the day rolls on.

Meschutt Beach County Park – Being on the interior of the Shinnecock Bay brings still water to this county beach. Camping, boating and bathing are great here, and so is the seafood served at the Meschutt Beach Hut.

Southampton

Southampton’s beaches are pristine, with heavyweights Cooper’s and Sagg Main Beach often scoring top ranks in national polls. Permits and fees can depend on which municipality is running the beach and a few offer daily passes, often only on weekdays. Either way, the scenery is like no other, with perfect dunes and picturesque estates stretching for miles.

Shinnecock East County Park – The only Suffolk county beach in Southampton, Shinnecock East is actually the westernmost beach on The Hamptons coast. A major fishing spot, Shinnecock highlights its undeveloped scenery. Southampton

Southampton Town

Sagg Main Beach – This might be perfect Hamptons beach setting, with few features to get in the way of the scenery. Perhaps that’s why droves of seasonal visitors tend to choose this beach. Every other Monday evening during the summer, Sagg Main Beach is the site of a large drum circle, with other spectacles like the occasional visit from fire dancers. No weekend passes for non-residents.

Mecox Beach – This Bridgehampton beach offers endless sand, and limited amenities. The setting is enough. Offers weekend non-resident passes.

Flying Point Beach – If you aren’t local, be sure to make arrangements to get to this Water Mill Beach since no daily passes are available. Incredibly scenic, with the dramatic Channel Pond behind the beach and the Water Mill beach Club nearby. No weekend non-resident passes.

Long Beach Park (Foster Memorial Town Beach) – Located in the hamlet of Noyac, Long Beach Park brings the expected calm of a bay beach, with still waters that are great for boating and fishing. On a narrow strip of land popular with sunbathers, it is a safe and scenic route for cyclists. Offers non-resident passes.

Southampton Village

Coopers Beach – Selected by “Dr. Beach” in 2010 as America’s best beach and, more recently, by National Geographic Traveler as the No. 2 family beach, Coopers is definitely a local champion. The only village beach with lifeguards, Cooper’s also gives visitors the option to rent chairs and umbrellas and has a complete concession stand to keep visitors well fed and hydrated. Grassy dunes, soft sand, and stately mansions dot the horizon at Coopers. And if the parking fee is too steep, the bike ride from Southampton Village isn’t so bad. The newly launched SpotRide will take you there for free.

The rest of Southampton Village beaches each offer their own slice of the coast, and in many cases give locals and returning seasonal guests serene getaways from the often crowded “scenes” at some of the more notable beaches in Southampton. Summer-long permits are required at Fowler Beach,Cryder BeachRoad G BeachHalsey Neck BeachWyandanch BeachGin BeachLittle Plains Beach and Old Town Beach while no permit is required at Road D Beach.

Sag Harbor Village

Havens Beach – For fans of North Fork Beaches, Sag Harbor’s Havens Beach is your typical scenic Peconic Bay treasure, with views of sailboats on the smooth bay waters and Shelter Island’s coast in the distance. Typical Sag Harbor resident only pass required on weekends in season.

East Hampton – Montauk

The riches of Hamptons beaches continues into East Hampton, where the sands, waves and the mansions tend to swell as you move East. But cross into Montauk and the surf clubs and swank scenes start to change until you at last hit Camp Hero with its miles of wilderness, bluffs and the Montauk Lighthouse at The End. For East Hampton and Montauk beaches, fees and accessibility depend on who runs them, but services such as Hamptons Free Ride can help visitors without permits get on the beaches.

Camp Hero State Park – The end of Long Island, Camp Hero is a wilderness like no other, with interior trails frequented by hikers, bikers and horseback riders, a museum, the historic Montauk Point Lighthouse and steep, dramatic bluffs that fall into the rough Atlantic Ocean. State park fees apply on the weekends, but the park is open for free during the week. A very popular spot for surf casting, too.

East Hampton Village

Main Beach – Easily the most visited beach in East Hampton, Main Beach offers a full pavilion with food and drinks, piping plover nests and grassy dunes along a stretch of beach that yearly attracts droves for its perfect vantage point to watch the Labor Day fireworks. It can definitely get crowded, though.  Village Parking passes required between Memorial Day and Labor Day…** Parking tickets will be given out for no pass!

Georgica Beach – Normally a peaceful beach for visitors who want less hub-bub, devastating erosion from Hurricane Irene has left this beach closed while officials work to replenish the sand and fix the damage. Village Parking Permit required.

Wiborg Beach – Located right near the Maidstone Club, the tucked-away and very scenic Wiborg has long been a favorite of surfers. However, there are no bathrooms or lifeguards here, though approvals for lifeguards are in the works. Village 
Parking Permit required.

Egypt Beach – On the other side of the Maidstone Club, Egypt is a bit more rugged than its neighbor Wiborg, but locals know it as one of the best places to catch the sunset. No lifeguards, though.

Two Mile Hollow Beach – A large parking lot with a daily rate makes this beautiful beach another often visited attraction. Not much by way of amenities, but very relaxing.

East Hampton Town

Indian Wells Beach – While the sand and surf are big draws here, as well as the family friendly atmosphere and volleyball courts, the row of food trucks that park there give this beach a unique draw. Surfers love it, too.

Ditch Plains – Another beach loved by locals and visitors alike, Ditch Plains is a huge favorite of surfers. Only two miles from the heart of Montauk, the beach also has beautiful cliffs that stand out in a region where sand dunes are more common to find on the beach.

Like Ditch Plains and Indian Wells, lifeguards can also be found at ocean beaches such as Atlantic Beach in Amagansett, Kirk Park Beach in Montauk and Edison Beach in Montauk while unprotected and still incredibly scenic beaches include Little Albert’s Landing in Amagansett Lazy Point in Amagansett, South Lake in Montauk, Beach Lane in Wainscott and Townline Road Beachin Wainscott. Kirk Park offers a daily rate on weekdays.

The town also has a few bay beaches that offer calmer waters for young swimmers and spectacular boating and fishing. Those are Albert’s Landing in Amagansett, Gin Beach in Montauk andMaidstone Park in Springs.

 

WSJBeard

Eric Striffler for The Wall Street Journal

This WSJ article about Peter Beards Montauk house is reminicent…check out the slideshow as well…md

The Original Hamptons Party House

Peter Beard’s Long Island property evokes memories of its sybaritic past

By  HANNAH KARP

There are few signs of the property’s wild past as an epicenter of the 1970s Studio 54 scene, when the likes of Mick and Bianca Jagger, Jacqueline Onassis and Andy Warhol converged here and helped transform the Hamptons into a glittery second stage for bold-faced Manhattanites. see the rest here

http://moneywatch.bnet.com/

Bernie Madoff’s Beach Home Sells For More lg_iglink_130x100Than List Price

By Ilyce Glink | Sep 17, 2009 |

Guess the home sale pundits were wrong: Bernie Madoff’s beach house location is worth more – not less.

A spokeswoman for Corcoran, the listing agent, confirmed today that Bernie Madoff’s Montauk, NY beach house went under contract for more than its $8.75 million list price. She didn’t have information on when the property would close or how much more than the list price the buyer or buyers were paying.

The sale is bound to raise some eyebrows and heighten suggestions that the housing crisis has turned the corner. Over the past year, sales in the Hamptons, some of the most expensive and exclusive property east of Aspen, Colorado, have slumped. The few properties that have sold have taken a big beating on price.

But as Wall Street goes, so do home values in the Hamptons, not to mention Manhattan. While Madoff’s 3,000 square foot beach house was spectacularly located (the house was built closer to the water than current building codes allow), the truth is that Wall Street now has a quarter or two of immense profits under its belt.

Profits = bigger salaries and bonuses. And bigger salaries and bonuses often translates into real estate purchases. If the money men (and women) of Wall Street believe that New York (or Hamptons) real estate is undervalued, and they have bonus cash in their pockets, you can expect them to pounce.

Does the Madoff beach house sale signal a true end to the housing crisis? Maybe. Let’s wait and see what his and Ruth’s co-op sells for.

by papagallery.com/Montauk_Point_6-01y.jpg


“The locals and longtime summer regulars are bitter about interlopers turning Montauk
into an eastern expansion of East Hampton. The arrivistes—Kelly Bensimon, Amanda Hearst, Andre Saffir, and legions of others who only a few years ago, never would have ventured West of the canal or East of Napeague Stretch—are there for the very thing the locals fear they’ll destroy. The newcomers want to outrun the development they wrought. The barbarians are at the gate, and they’re wearing Givenchy jeans and Ed Hardy T-shirts. They love the light, the air, the natural beauty, but they bring with them the market for trendy shops and, eventually, Starbucks, Blockbusters and CVS. When the chain stores arrive, stalwarts and recent arrivals alike will decry that the place isn’t what it used to be together, and wish they could move further east, to find some place more pure, more authentic, that doesn’t have a Coach store next to a Gucci store next to an Elie Tahari. The problem is, after Montauk, there’s nowhere further east to flee.”

Coming to The End: Montauk’s Indian Summer Dies Out

September 04, 2009

Corcoran Consolidates East Hampton Offices

One month after closing two East End offices, Corcoran is now consolidating its two Main Street offices in East Hampton.

The Surf Lodge in Montauk Opens for the Season on May 15

Summer is officially upon us: the Montauk Surf Lodge will be opening for business starting on May 15th. The Hamptons hotspot has been accepting rezzies since April 15th, and…

23% drop in prices of Hamptons homes
New York Daily News – New York,NY,USA
HOME PRICES in the Hamptons, the oceanside playground for the rich and famous, are plummeting. The financial crisis that fueled 23000 lost jobs on Wall

In Southampton Epley, McGann And Robinson Make Bids For Third Terms
Hamptons.com – Southampton,NY,USA
“Twelve years ago, the Hampton Road firehouse was inadequate,” Robinson offered, explaining that improvements have still not been made.

Have the Hamptons lost their cachet?

The Real Deal, New York, NY

Hamptons Home Prices Plummet 23% as Summer Home Demand Cools
Bloomberg – USA
By Oshrat Carmiel April 23 (Bloomberg) — Home prices in the Hamptons, the oceanside getaway of celebrities and Wall Street financiers, plummeted in the

Hamptons, North Fork median home prices fall
Newsday – Long Island,NY,USA
BY ELLEN YAN | ellen.yan@newsday.com Hamptons and North Fork median home prices this year saw the biggest quarterly drops since a Manhattan-based appraiser

EECO Farm Offers Prime Loam For The Veggie Grower In Your House
Hamptons.com – Southampton,NY,USA
East Hampton – Most people have probably entertained the idea of starting a garden and growing their own vegetables at some point or another,

Tale Of Gin Lane Wall Stands Tall As Bricks Cave To Time
Hamptons.com – Southampton,NY,USA
According to the 2007 book “Houses of the Hamptons,” – an illustrated history of Hamptons’ estates from 1880 to 1930 written by Gary Lawrance and Anne

aaastartopnav

News reports have consistently cited a “market value” of $3.3 million since the story of the executive’s alleged $50 billion Ponzi scheme broke on Dec. 11. According to the East Hampton Town Assessors Office, the 1.2-acre parcel was last assessed in 1983 at $2.7 million.

“The value right now is based on the assessment, and this is not market value,” Jeanne Nielsen, a town assessor, said. “I’m sure it’s worth much more than that; this is a magnificent waterfront property.”

see complete EHStar story here

What a great story and EXACTLY what the people want to see public preservation funds used for.

Very often, we don’t know what land/property is available for development until after it is too late and the developer brings down the bulldozer. Cheers to the parties that made this deal happen!!  See story below.

77 Acre Cavett Property in Montauk, NY To Be Preserved

77 Acre Cavett Property in Montauk, NY To Be Preserved

 

 

 

  Tuesday, October 28, 2008 <!– letters · –>  

     


County Finalizes Joint Purchase Of Cavett Parcels Completing Moorlands Preservation
Aaron Boyd

Spec builders grow cautious in Hamptons

 

Hamptons developers turn to pre-construction marketing to mitigate expenses

 

A six-bedroom spec home on 1.5 acres at 493 Parsonage Lane in Sagaponack is still on the market, but builder Joe Farrell said he rented it for $600,000 for the summer.

By Julia Dahl

Speculative building is a risky endeavor almost anywhere. From the initial land purchase to the process of obtaining permits, hiring an architect and overseeing construction, building a home before you have a buyer is not for the faint of heart. In tony spots, like the East End of Long Island, where the price of land has gone up seven-fold in the past 10 years, it can be an even bigger risk.

And a year after the subprime mortgage crisis, it can be downright dangerous.

“I can’t imagine why anyone would go into speculative building right now,” said Walter Molony of the National Association of Realtors.

Nationwide, building is down. Though spec building isn’t broken out from the stats, new housing starts dipped 27 percent from 2007, which was itself a drop of 24 percent from 2006.

However, Michael Davis, a longtime developer of high-end properties in the Hamptons, argued that, “the Hamptons is unique.” Davis, who has already sold one spec home in Southampton this year for $5.9 million, has two others in the works. “If you’re in the right location in the Hamptons,” he said, “demand exceeds supply, even now.”

Still, market watchers are aware that even the Hamptons have not been completely immune to the fluctuations of the national market. In Southampton, for example, the number of new dwelling permits issued so far this year is just over a third of what it was in 2005. Between January and June 2008, the town handed out 62 permits — down from 88 last year, 130 in 2006, and 175 in 2005.

According to Michael Daly, a broker with RE/MAX Beach Properties who also blogs about Hamptons real estate, a select group of developers and builders (including Michael Davis) have been betting on the Hamptons market for decades — and though they may be adjusting their expectations, they certainly aren’t packing it in. Instead, said Daly, some speculative builders have begun marketing their new homes pre-construction, thereby reducing the, well, speculation.

“More and more builders are putting out their products with sophisticated renderings and floorplans, seeking to gauge the level of interest before they start building,” Daly said.

He estimates that there are about one-third fewer “new construction” homes currently on the market in the Hamptons than there were last year. Of those approximately 135 homes, Daly said that about one-third are being offered “pre-construction.” He said that pool of inventory includes 60 percent of the homes on the market with asking prices above $10 million and 42 percent of the homes currently listed between $2 million and $5 million.

In Bridgehampton, for example, one 6,000-square-foot oceanfront property is listed for $22.9 million “total turnkey,” or alternatively for $15.9 million “as is with plans and permits.” In Quogue, a 9,600-square-foot bayfront property with a wine cellar, gym and tennis court on 4.1 acres is being offered pre-construction for $15.5 million.

“Builders are trying to mitigate a bit of their exposure,” said Daly, who points to 35 homes in the area that have been built but not sold.

Bernard Markstein, senior economist and director of forecasting for the National Association of Home Builders, said “mom-and-pop speculators, the people who got in during the housing boom, have largely shaken out or are licking their wounds trying to figure out what to do with their property. The long-term players, on the other hand, are simply trying not to overextend themselves.”

Custom homebuilder Joe Farrell is one of those long-term players. Farrell, who Daly called “one of the most successful builders in the Hamptons,” said he’s sold eight speculative homes in various stages of pre-construction, at prices ranging from $2.1 million to $18 million, in the last six months.

“One house [is] sitting a little longer than usual, but we ended up renting it for $600,000 for the summer,” Farrell said.

Still, he does admit to being a bit more cautious in the new market. “I’m only buying land if I can get a great deal,” said Farrell.

For his part, Davis said that about one-third of his current business is speculative construction and that the volume of spec homes he’s working on hasn’t changed much in the past year.

“Last year when subprime hit, it sounded as if the real estate market as a whole was going down the tubes,” said Davis. “But I think it’s unfortunate that the press tends to generalize.”

Don Sharkey, the chief building inspector for the town of East Hampton, said building permits overall are “definitely down about 10 percent.” But, he notes, they don’t have data isolating new construction.

Meanwhile, Don Louchheim, the mayor of the Village of Sagaponack, told The Real Deal that the village is currently considering four subdivision proposals, representing about 100 acres total.

The right location, said agents and builders, is key, as are views.

Jeffrey Colle, who has been building and restoring high-end homes in the Hamptons for 30 years, said he is “absolutely as busy” as he was two years ago.

Colle is currently at work on a $40 million spec home in East Hampton, on which he is sparing no expense — from 18th-century fireplaces to bathtubs carved in Italy. The 12,000-square-foot home on Georgica Pond abuts a meadow reserve and will boast an infinity pool, six bedrooms, seven fireplaces and “sunsets that’ll knock your eyes out,” he said.

Colle said he’s already had brokers from Sotheby’s come by, as well as potential buyers from as far away as California and Australia. “I’ve been out here 30 years, and I’ve never seen the top of the market go down,” said Colle.

And that’s good news for other high-end developers like Robert Gianos, who has spent several years preparing to construct a Southampton subdivision that some have dubbed “Billionaire’s Corner.” Nothing like your typical suburban tract home, Gianos’ Olde Towne is reportedly inspired by the look of the village from when it was originally settled in the 1640s. Lots are reportedly priced at between $18 and $22 million.

“He’s building for untouchables,” said Daly, who reasons that since Gianos’ potential buyer won’t care what the price of gas is, the developer needn’t fret over market fluctuations either.

1Q 08

Jonathan Miller has put together the market report for the East End.

Read the complete report here

 

Alfredo Cristo

Loreto Mexico is located approximately 400 km North of the tip of the Baja Peninsula between the Sea of Cortez and the Sierra de la Giganta Mountains.  The stunning and diverse terrain is like no other in the Baja.  There is much biological diversity and varied geological points of interest.  The Sea of Cortez coastline at Loreto is home to reefs, mountains, caverns, bays, islands and coves.  This natural paradise has been protected as a National Maritime Park since 2000 and is home to many aquatic wonders such as: starfish, sea urchins, killer whales, fan coral, mother-of-pearl, blue whales, dolphins and sea lions.

see the rest of the blogpost here

 

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